All This Ending Leads to More Beginnings

Technology almost always democratizes art, because it gives us better tools, better access and a quicker route to mediocrity …

Technology almost always democratizes art, because it gives us better tools, better access and a quicker route to mediocrity … And so, when technology shows up, it’s easy to imagine that along with the old school becoming obsolete, the new school will be populated by nothing but lazy poseurs … all this ending is leading to more and more beginnings, isn’t it? It’s not ruined, it’s merely different.

— Seth Godin

Sometimes I get in a funk when I think about the time that gets sucked up keeping up with technology and how it has rapidly changed so many aspects of our lives and the ways we make a living.

But it doesn’t last long.

Why? 

It’s empowering to be able to think of an idea and then to execute it.

We can create things and we can create experiences. 

Just. Like. That.

Weegee on Making Photographs

“When you find yourself beginning to feel a bond between yourself and the people you photograph, when you laugh and cry with their laugher and tears, you know you are on the right track…Good luck.”

~ Weegee

Last night, Mike and I headed to the photography exhibit and lecture of “Weegee the Famous” at the White Box in the Stag building in Old Town. The quote above was underneath a few of the photos and I felt compelled to keep it and share it with you.

Throughout my career I’ve heard on numerous occasions about how photographers (photojournalists) should be “objective”; that they are to only document and be the so-called “fly-on-the-wall”.

I’ve had photographer friends (especially women) who were told they “care too much” or are “too emotionally invested”.

I say bullshit.

I think you can tell when a photographer cares or doesn’t care. And from what I’ve seen, the stronger the point-of-view, the understanding, the compassion; the stronger the photograph and the body of work.

If you are a fan of Weegee, head to Old Town and see just a handle of photographs from a much larger exhibit.

White Box
24 NW First Ave
Ground floor of the White Stag Building, Old Town
Portland, Oregon
Open from noon to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays
Admission is free.